Aspirin and Tinnitus

What is the Relationship Between Aspirin and Tinnitus?

There are some important things that you need to know about the relationship between aspirin and tinnitus, and the bottom line is that it will probably make your tinnitus much worse. Although there are plenty of desperate people out there who would like to find treatment for their tinnitus, they will have to look somewhere besides aspirin.

This over the counter drug actually makes the ringing in the ears from tinnitus much worse, which is why doctors recommend that people look somewhere else for treatment. While Aspirin can definitely be rather helpful with certain medical conditions, aspirin and tinnitus is definitely not a good combination.

You may have heard of how Native Americans used to use willow bark tea to treat certain people in their tribes. This is because that tea contained an active ingredient known as salicylic acid. The main compound in Aspirin is acetylsalicylic acid, which is actually derived from that same substance found naturally in willow tree bark.

You would think that there would not be many bad side effects of using a medication that seems to have such natural roots, but that is simply not the truth of the matter. There are plenty of anti-pain qualities found in Aspirin, and it can also thin your blood in certain situations as well. While it is definitely a mildly powerful painkiller, it does not work very well when you are trying to use it to treat tinnitus. Aspirin and tinnitus are definitely not good friends.

What Happens When You Combine Aspirin and Tinnitus?

Anyone who tries to use Aspirin as treatment for tinnitus is going to find that the painkiller and blood thinner provides nothing but negative effects. When you combine aspirin and tinnitus, you will find that the ringing in your ears will be aggravated and you could actually cause damage to your ears. The toxic aspect of Aspirin can sometimes relieve pain, but it is also that part of the Aspirin that can worsen that ringing sound in your ears.

Most people do not think twice about using Aspirin for a number of different problems, but you really need to be careful about what you are using it for. There have been plenty of articles and journals written on the negative effects of Aspirin on tinnitus in the past, so there is plenty of evidence that people can look at if they are thinking about trying Aspirin for their tinnitus problems anyway. In some cases, Aspirin has proven to be one of the main causes behind the appearance of tinnitus in the first place. For these people, Aspirin and tinnitus really go hand in hand.

aspirin and tinnitus

If Aspirin and Tinnitus Don’t Mix, Is There a Better Alternative¬† Treatment?

Although you will not be able to simply pop an Aspirin to get rid of tinnitus, there are still plenty of other things you can do to get your ears back to normal. Different forms of treatment have proven to work for different people, so you may need to try a few different things to see what works for you. In fact, sometimes a combination of a few different lifestyle changes is all it takes to get rid of that annoying ringing in your ears. You should make sure that you do not discount any of the possible treatments that could work for you because the most important thing you can do right now is get rid of that ringing noise and regain your sanity.

The first route you can take towards getting rid of your tinnitus is taking a few toxins out of your life. Everyone knows that too much coffee, alcohol and smoking can cause problems, but you are really shooting yourself in the foot when it comes to combining these vices with tinnitus. You should try to cut back on the amount of alcohol and caffeine you are drinking, and you definitely need to cut out the smoking. Smoking tobacco will absolutely make your problems much worse because nicotine actually reduces the blood flow to the ear.

You should obviously limit your intake of over the counter pain medications such as ibuprofen and naproxen because we already know that Aspirin and tinnitus do not mix very well. You will also want to make sure that you are exercising on a regular basis because it will improve blood flow to the portions of the ear that have been affected by tinnitus. While exercise is definitely a positive, you do not want to overdue it with marathon-length jogs.

What Else Can You Do to Fight Against Tinnitus?

In addition to remembering that alcohol, tobacco, caffeine, aspirin and tinnitus are not very good combinations, there are also some other tips that your doctor may give you if you go to see him or her with your problem.

First of all, you should try to avoid loud noises as often as possible. You may even want to put on earmuffs or some other noise canceling headwear if you have anything too noisy going on around the house. Secondly, it could never hurt to simply try to ignore the ringing sound. You cannot let the sound in your ears control your life while it is happening, so perhaps you should think about trying to occupy your time with something constructive. In other words, try to get your mind off of the ringing sound as often as possible. You could try reading a book or getting some work done if you are someone who can get lost in what is in front of them from time to time.

Sometimes You Will Need Some Extra Help

If none of the above solutions seem to work for you, then you may need to visit your medical practitioner. While tinnitus is sometimes not a severe problem, it can sometimes get much worse if it is not treated. If none of the home remedies seem to be working for you, then you will need the help of a doctor to get to the bottom of your issues. Serious loss of hearing, vertigo, dizziness, weakness and numbness on the side of your face are all signs of a serious problem with tinnitus. For the purpose of our present discussion however, as long as you remember the fact that aspirin and tinnitus do not mix well and that there are a number of other home remedies that could work, you may be able to avoid the doctor entirely.

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